Honeybees, Research, Resilience, Health, Breed

Scientists Hoping to Breed Disease Resistant Bees

Pathogen Patterns By studying the genes of honeybees, scientists may one day better comprehend the diseases and viruses that affect them, specifically how their genes resist. “In the past decade, honeybee populations have experienced severe and persistent losses across the Northern Hemisphere, mainly due to the effects of pathogens, such as fungi and viruses,” says…

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Drones, Agriculture, Bees, Pollinators

Scientists Building Bee Drones in Case of Extinction

It’s well known that honeybee and other bee populations are decreasing globally and alarmingly quick. Because of the possibility of bee extinction, while very far off, is a possibility nonetheless, researchers from the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) in Japan are developing pollinating drones since human beings rely heavily on bees…

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Pesticides, Honeybees, Neonicotinoids,

Study on Pesticides – Low Risk to Honeybees?

A recent study by a global agrochemical company, which concluded there was only a low risk to honeybees from the widely used popular pesticides neonicotinoids, has been called “misleading” in new research published by statisticians from Scotland’s University of St. Andrews. Neonicotinoids, also called neonics, may be implicated in honeybee losses and that of other…

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honey, honeybees, bees

East Africa May Hold Key to Healthier Honeybees

Honeybees have been serving as pollinators for millennia, and today they support a multi-billion dollar agriculture industry. However, honeybee health has never been more precarious. Misuse of pesticides, pests within the hive, and climate change are among the threats they face. Most honeybee populations in the U.S. and Europe are showing signs of stress—that is,…

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US, EPA, pesticides

EPA Decision Enrages Environmentalists

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) acknowledged that three of the nation’s most popular neonicotinoid pesticides pose risks to commercial honeybees. However, in a recent second decision, the agency refused to restrict the use of any deadly pesticides despite evidence of their harm to pollinators. The EPA analysis indicated that honeybees can be harmed by…

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honeybees,

Pennsylvania Honeybees Experiencing Trouble

Pennsylvania honeybees are experiencing trouble as hives begin to deplete. “Statewide, we are holding our own, but we have to replace our bees frequently,” said Charlie Vorisek, president of the Pennsylvania State Beekeepers Association (PSBA) from 2012 to 2016. “We probably bring in over $1 million worth of honeybees from the south every spring to…

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Pesticides, Chemical Companies, Court Ruling, Honeybees

Ruling May Change Bee Death, Pesticides Debate

Safety tests submitted to European regulators by chemical companies will be revealed soon and could have a major impact on the debate around the number of global bee deaths. The decision has been hailed by environmental groups, which have insisted on transparency relating to how pesticides are regulated. Neonicotinoid pesticides, including those manufactured by Bayer…

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wound care, manuka horse, horses

Doctor Says Manuka Honey Works for Wound Care?

According to Dr. Anna O’Brien, a veterinarian, a study was conducted at the University of Glasglow, and it led researchers to the conclusion that various types of honey have antimicrobial properties that could help inhibit the growth of bacteria often found in horse leg wounds. Also, another Glasglow study claims to have discovered agents in honey…

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Rainfall, Bad weather

Bad Weather Will Slow Honey Down

Heavy rains in South Australia are delaying plants from blossoming and leaving beekeepers without honey. The rainfall seems to be slowing down production, especially in Adelaide Hills. It is ironic considering lack of rain and dry seasons are usually the greatest concern with most farms, as a proper balance of rainfall and dryness being an essential…

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manuka honey, pollinating hives, new zealand, wild bees, flowers

Flowers Crucial Link Between Bacteria and Wild Bees

The honeybee’s cousins are gaining more attention this week due to new research from the University of California Riverside. Wild bee species are quickly becoming more important to the pollination and honey-making process due to the growing increase in colony collapse disorder (CCD), which is negatively affecting millions of honeybees all over the world. Bearing…

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maryland pesticides, neonicotinoids,

Pesticides Hurting Queen Bees’ Egg-Laying Ability

If beekeepers are looking to have healthier colonies this year and many more to come, a new study out of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln suggests they put pesticides down—or at least the highly popular classes of nicotine-based pesticides that hold great similarities to neonicotinoid pesticides, which have largely come under scrutiny in recent years. According to this…

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honeybees, nectar hogs, pollination, FDA

FDA Now Requires Honeybee Hives Be Treated by Vets

By January 2017, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will begin requiring beekeepers who need antibiotics to treat their hives—which can be up to thousands—to have them treated by a veterinarian, rather than beekeepers simply buying antibiotics over the counter. “Beekeepers are going to need a veterinarian now,” said Don Hoenig, a former Maine veterinarian.…

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honeyguides, honey hunters, Mozambique

Honeyguides: Uniting People and Honey in Mozambique

Most have heard that within nature, animals can form symbiotic relationships with other animals, plant life, and so forth, with some being commensal, mutualistic, or parasitic. In northern Mozambique, a southern African country across the channel from Madagascar, the village of Mbamba and its surrounding plains is the home to a mutualistic relationship many believed…

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