raw honey, manuka honey

Fighting eczema can be a challenge even when you have the best medicines out there. If you’re looking to add to your treatment of the itchy, dry skin you’ve come to expect from eczema, you can always check out a few natural home remedies. Whether it’s a cream, a natural product, or lifestyle and dietary changes, you can manage your eczema flare-ups even in the coldest of times, such as right now. These remedies won’t cure your condition, but they may help provide you with some much-needed relief. Now, I’m sure you’ve heard of aloe vera and apple cider vinegar, but here are some other natural remedies to give you a helping hand…

Colloidal Oatmeal

Known also by the name Avena sativa, colloidal oatmeal comes from oats that were boiled and grounded in order to extract anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, which a study from 2015 said led to improvements in scaling, dryness, itch intensity, and roughness. To use, add colloidal oatmeal in powder form to a hot bath and then soak in it, but be sure to choose a product with only oats in it and no additives or fragrances. Also, people with allergies to oats or gluten should avoid using colloidal oatmeal.

Baths

Baths are a crucial, sometimes underappreciated, part of treating eczema. For those who have skin conditions like eczema, you need extra moisture for your skin, as its outer layer doesn’t function properly. In some cases, frequent washing can actually dry the skin out and make the condition worse, which occurs when you use water that’s too cold or hot, use the wrong kind of soap, or don’t moisturize afterward.

For adult eczema patients, the National Eczema Association (NEA) recommends bathing or showering once per day at least, using lukewarm water, no scrubbing of the skin, limiting bathing between 10 and 15 minutes, using gentle cleansers rather than soaps, and trying different kinds of medicinal bathing, including with vinegar, baking soda, or oatmeal. Also, after bathing, you should moisturize within the first three to four minutes of finishing.

Raw Honey

  • Used for centuries for allegedly treating wounds, raw honey has been said to have natural anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties, with one review saying it could supposedly boost the immune system to help fight infections and that it works well for treating various skin ailments. If you want to use it for eczema, try applying some raw honey to the affected area and leaving it there for 10 to 15 minutes before rinsing it off gently.

Dietary Changes

Eczema is known to be an inflammatory illness, meaning it causes red, inflamed, or sore skin. Specific foods can either promote or decrease the likelihood of inflammation and making several key changes to your diet could help reduce eczema flare-ups. Some anti-inflammatory foods to consider are leafy greens, fish, lentils, beans, vegetables, colorful fruits, cinnamon, and turmeric. Contrarily, inflammatory foods you should avoid include eggs, dairy, wheat, and soy.

Gentle Detergents and Soaps

Many body cleansers and washes contain detergents in order to provide a soapier lather, but detergents and similar lathering agents tend to dry the skin out, especially for eczema patients. Bar soaps are also rough for skin due to their alkalinity. Instead of these options, try using a fragrance-free, no-lather, gentle cleanser and avoiding products with rougher particles for exfoliating or scrubbing, which could irritate your skin further. Also, many eczema patients have found that switching over to gentler, color-, or fragrance-free laundry detergents can help to improve their symptoms.

Photo Copyright : YASUHIRO AMANO

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

clear formSubmit